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Writing a good CV/resume example & exercise

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Because the tracing was done with a dark pen, the outline should be visible on the sheet below. Direct students to use the outlines as guides and to write their words around it. Provide students a variety of different colored pencils or markers to use as they write. Then invite students to share their work with the class. They might cut out the hand outlines and mount them on construction paper so you can display the hands for open house. Challenge each parent to identify his or her child's hand.

Then provide each student with five different-colored paper strips. Have each student write a different talent on separate paper strips, then create a mini paper chain with the strips by linking the five talents together.

As students complete their mini chains, use extra strips of paper to link the mini chains together to create one long class chain. Have students stand and hold the growing chain as you link the pieces together. Once the entire chain is constructed and linked, lead a discussion about what the chain demonstrates -- for example, all the students have talents; all the students have things they do well; together, the students have many talents; if they work together, classmates can accomplish anything; the class is stronger when students work together than when individual students work on their own.

Hang the chain in the room as a constant reminder to students of the talents they possess and the benefits of teamwork. Your school librarian might have a discard pile you can draw from. Invite students to search through the magazines for pictures, words, or anything else that might be used to describe them. Then use an overhead projector or another source of bright light to create a silhouette of each student's profile; have each student sit in front of the light source as you or another student traces the outline of the silhouette on a sheet of by inch paper taped to the wall.

Have students cut out their silhouettes, then fill them with a collage of pictures and words that express their identity. Then give each student an opportunity to share his or her silhouette with the group and talk about why he or she chose some of the elements in the collage.

Post the silhouettes to create a sense of "our homeroom. You can use such cards to gather other information too, such as school schedule, why the student signed up for the class, whether the student has a part-time job, and whether he or she has access to the Internet at home. As a final bit of information, ask the student to write a headline that best describes him or her!

This headline might be a quote, a familiar expression, or anything else. When students finish filling out the cards, give a little quiz. Then read aloud the headlines one at a time.

Ask students to write the name of the person they think each headline best describes. Who got the highest score? It seems as if parents are contacted only if there is a problem with students. At the end of each grading period, use the home address information to send a postcard to a handful of parents to inform them about how well their child is doing. This might take a little time, but it is greatly appreciated! Pop Quiz Ahead of time, write a series of getting-to-know-you questions on slips of paper -- one question to a slip.

You can repeat some of the questions. Then fold up the slips, and tuck each slip inside a different balloon. Blow up the balloons. Give each student a balloon, and let students take turns popping their balloons and answering the questions inside. Contributor Unknown Fact or Fib? This is a good activity for determining your students' note-taking abilities.

Tell students that you are going to share some information about yourself. They'll learn about some of your background, hobbies, and interests from the second oral "biography" that you will present.

Suggest that students take notes; as you speak, they should record what they think are the most important facts you share. When you finish your presentation, tell students that you are going to tell five things about yourself. Four of your statements should tell things that are true and that were part of your presentation; one of the five statements is a total fib. This activity is most fun if some of the true facts are some of the most surprising things about you and if the "fib" sounds like something that could very well be true.

Tell students they may refer to their notes to tell which statement is the fib. Next, invite each student to create a biography and a list of five statements -- four facts and one fib -- about himself or herself.

Then provide each student a chance to present the second oral biography and to test the others' note-taking abilities by presenting his or her own "fact or fib quiz. Mitzi Geffen Circular Fact or Fib? Here's a variation on the previous activity: Organize students into two groups of equal size. One group forms a circle equally spaced around the perimeter of the classroom. There will be quite a bit of space between students. The other group of students forms a circle inside the first circle; each student faces one of the students in the first group.

Give the facing pairs of students two minutes to share their second oral "biographies. After each pair completes the activity, the students on the inside circle move clockwise to face the next student in the outer circle. Students in the outer circle remain stationary throughout the activity. When all students have had an opportunity to share their biographies with one another, ask students to take turns each sharing facts and fibs with the class.

The other students refer to their notes or try to recall which fact is really a fib. Contributor Unknown People Poems Have each child use the letters in his or her name to create an acrostic poem.

Tell students they must include words that tell something about themselves -- for example, something they like to do or a personality or physical trait. Invite students to share their poems with the class. This activity is a fun one that enables you to learn how your students view themselves.

Allow older students to use a dictionary or thesaurus. You might also vary the number of words for each letter, according to the students' grade levels. Bill Laubenberg Another Poetic Introduction. Ask students to use the form below to create poems that describe them.

This activity lends itself to being done at the beginning of the school year and again at the end of the year. You and your students will have fun comparing their responses and seeing how the students and the responses have changed. Contributor Unknown Food for Thought To get to know students and to help them get to know one another, have each student state his or her name and a favorite food that begins with the same first letter as the name.

Watch out -- it gets tricky for the last person who has to recite all the names and foods! Here's a challenging activity that might help high school teachers learn about students' abilities to think critically. Send students into the school hallways or schoolyard, and ask each to find something that "is completely the opposite of yourself.

To widen the area to be explored, provide this activity as homework on the first night of school. When students bring their items back to class, ask each to describe why the item is not like him or her.

You'll get a lot of flowers, of course, and students will describe how those flowers are fragrant or soft or otherwise unlike themselves. But you might also get some clever responses, such as the one from a young man who brought in the flip-top from a discarded can; he talked about its decaying outward appearance and its inability to serve a purpose without being manipulated by some other force and how he was able to serve a purpose on his own.

Joy Ross Personal Boxes In this activity, each student selects a container of a reasonable size that represents some aspect of his or her personality or personal interests, such as a football helmet or a saucepan.

Ask students to fill that object with other items that represent themselves -- for example, family photos, CDs, dirty socks, a ballet shoe -- and bring their containers back to school. Students can use the objects in the containers as props for three-minute presentations about themselves. The teacher who provided this idea suggests that you model the activity and encourage creativity by going first -- it's important for students to see you as human too!

She included in her container a wooden spoon because she loves to cook, a jar of dirt because she loves to garden, her son's first cowboy boot, a poem she wrote, a rock from Italy because she loves to travel, and so on. You'll learn much about each student with this activity, and it will create a bond among students.

As each student gives a presentation, you might write a brief thank-you note that mentions something specific about the presentation so that each student can take home a special note to share with parents. It might take a few days to give every student the opportunity to share. Getting to Know One Another Volume 2: Who's in the Classroom?

My Classmates and Me Volume 4: Activities for the First Day of School Volume Back-to-School Activities Volume 5: Be sure to see our tips for using Every-Day Edits in your classroom. See our idea file. Run out of Every-Day Edit activities for the month of September? Check out our Xtra activities for any time of year. This course is designed for all K educators looking for a fun and engaging way to help students take control of their own learning by using gamification.

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The use of formal verbs and words makes you sound more professional. For example, instead of using 'can', use 'able to', or 'thorough' instead of 'careful'. Although using professional sounding vocabulary won't help you get an interview if you don't have the skills or experience that they are looking for, it will help if you do.

Click here to see examples of professional sounding CV and job interview vocabulary. These jobs are more relevant for the job being applied for than the others: So, you have to focus more on some jobs than others. The decision on which jobs you focus more on depends on their relevancy to the job you are applying for. If a job is not relevant, write a couple of sentences at most about what it was and your main responsibilities. Although you can do it if the job was a long time ago or you did it when studying , if it leaves a large unexplained time gap in your work experience, the person seeing it may wonder what you were doing then.

In the work experience section you need to account for all your time. So it's best to include any period of unemployment, sabbaticals e. Fire warden for the floor of the office: The best way to decide what is, is to put yourself in the position of the person looking to hire somebody for the job. What experience, responsibilities, achievements and qualifications would they be looking for and what wouldn't they care about?

It won't take long to do and it will improve your chances of getting a job interview. I was a member of the division's marketing strategy group: When you write about yourself, you don't start sentences with a subject e.

Instead, you should always start a sentence with a verb e. Instead of writing, 'I presented the annual sales team awards for the company' You should use, 'Presented the annual sales team awards for the company' This is especially important to do when you write about your roles, responsibilities and achievements in the different jobs you've had. For some reason it just looks more professional.

The only section where you should start sentences with a subject is 'interests'. With qualifications and training, only include those which the potential employer would see as necessary or relevant.

Exclude those which have nothing to do with the job. It is relevant for the job you are applying for: If they don't find it or there's too much information which they don't see as relevant, your chances of being offered an interview are low.

What is relevant will change for each job you apply for. The best way to decide what is or what isn't, is to put yourself in the position of the person looking to hire somebody for the job. Likewise, are there things you need to change or remove because they are not relevant for the job you are applying for. To help me do this, I have a word document which contains all the phrases which I have used for achievements, responsibilities, qualifications, trainings etc It makes it quicker and easier to read for potential employers: To save time, most people normally skim through most of them, searching for experiences, responsibilities, achievements etc The harder and longer it takes them to find the information that they are looking, the higher the probability that the candidate will be rejected.

So it's essential you try to make this task as easy for them as possible. Use a standard structure where the different sections, jobs etc And make sure that the information you include is relevant for the job you are applying for. If you do this, you chances of being selected for a job interview will be significantly increased. This is me, Chris Clayton, the owner and main writer for Blair English. I'm also a part-time English teacher in sunny Spain.

I have a love of history and the web. I hope you find the website useful. Universidad de Complutense, Madrid, Spain: Potential employers are used to CVs having this section order It looks good. To make the resume look pretty To help people quickly find the information they are looking for.

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Enelow–Kursmark Executive Resume Toolkit Worksheets EXERCISE #4: WRITE THE EXECUTIVE SUMMARY SECTION OF YOUR RESUME Draft your summary to include the most important information about yourself and your career. Be sure to include some of the executive brand information you developed in Exercise #2.

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