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Does homework really work?

Does homework improve student achievement?

❶Do you think education is vital to be successful in life?

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From the homework laboratories
Yes homework works
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It seems safe to say that these latest four studies offer no reason to revise the earlier summary statement that no meaningful evidence exists of an academic advantage for children in elementary school who do homework.

The correlation only spikes at or above grade A large correlation is necessary, in other words, but not sufficient. Indeed, I believe it would be a mistake to conclude that homework is a meaningful contributor to learning even in high school. Remember that Cooper and his colleagues found a positive effect only when they looked at how much homework high school students actually did as opposed to how much the teacher assigned and only when achievement was measured by the grades given to them by those same teachers.

All of the cautions, qualifications, and criticisms in this chapter, for that matter, are relevant to students of all ages. Students who take this test also answer a series of questions about themselves, sometimes including how much time they spend on homework.

For any number of reasons, one might expect to find a reasonably strong association between time spent on homework and test scores. Yet the most striking result, particularly for elementary students, is precisely the absence of such an association.

Consider the results of the math exam. Fourth graders who did no homework got roughly the same score as those who did 30 minutes a night. Remarkably, the scores then declined for those who did 45 minutes, then declined again for those who did an hour or more! In twelfth grade, the scores were about the same regardless of whether students did only 15 minutes or more than an hour.

In the s, year-olds in a dozen nations were tested and also queried about how much they studied. Again, the results were not the same in all countries, even when the focus was limited to the final years of high school where the contribution of homework is thought to be strongest. Usually it turned out that doing some homework had a stronger relationship with achievement than doing none at all, but doing a little homework was also better than doing a lot.

Again they came up empty handed. Our students get significantly less homework than their counterparts across the globe. Every step of this syllogism is either flawed or simply false.

Premise 2 has been debunked by a number of analysts and for a number of different reasons. But in fact there is now empirical evidence, not just logic, to challenge the conclusions.

Two researchers looked at TIMSS data from both and in order to be able to compare practices in 50 countries. When they published their findings in , they could scarcely conceal their surprise:. Not only did we fail to find any positive relationships, [but] the overall correlations between national average student achievement and national averages in the frequency, total amount, and percentage of teachers who used homework in grading are all negative!

If these data can be extrapolated to other subjects — a research topic that warrants immediate study, in our opinion — then countries that try to improve their standing in the world rankings of student achievement by raising the amount of homework might actually be undermining their own success. More homework may actually undermine national achievement. Incidental research raises further doubts about homework. Reviews of homework studies tend to overlook investigations that are primarily focused on other topics but just happen to look at homework, among several other variables.

Here are two examples:. First, a pair of Harvard scientists queried almost 2, students enrolled in college physics courses in order to figure out whether any features of their high school physics courses were now of use to them. At first they found a very small relationship between the amount of homework that students had had in high school and how well they were currently doing.

Once the researchers controlled for other variables, such as the type of courses kids had taken, that relationship disappeared. The same researchers then embarked on a similar study of a much larger population of students in college science classes — and found the same thing: She then set out to compare their classroom practices to those of a matched group of other teachers. Are better teachers more apt to question the conventional wisdom in general? More responsive to its negative effects on children and families?

This analysis rings true for Steve Phelps, who teaches math at a high school near Cincinnati. But as I mastered the material, homework ceased to be necessary. Lyons has also conducted an informal investigation to gauge the impact of this shift. He gave less and less homework each year before finally eliminating it completely. And he reports that.

Homework is an obvious burden to students, but assigning, collecting, grading, and recording homework creates a tremendous amount of work for me as well. Nor is the Harvard physics study. People who never bought it will not be surprised, of course. Put differently, the research offers no reason to believe that students in high-quality classrooms whose teachers give little or no homework would be at a disadvantage as regards any meaningful kind of learning.

That will be the subject of the following chapter…. Two of the four studies reviewed by Paschal et al. The third found benefits at two of three grade levels, but all of the students in this study who were assigned homework also received parental help.

The last study found that students who were given math puzzles unrelated to what was being taught in class did as well as those who got traditional math homework. There is reason to question whether this technique is really appropriate for a topic like homework, and thus whether the conclusions drawn from it would be valid. Meta-analyses may be useful for combining multiple studies of, say, the efficacy of a blood pressure medication, but not necessarily studies dealing with different aspects of complex human behavior.

Homework contributes to higher achievement, which then, in turn, predisposes those students to spend more time on it. But correlations between the two leave us unable to disentangle the two effects and determine which is stronger. Epstein and Van Voorhis, pp. Also see Walberg et al. In Cooper et al. Wednesday dismissal is 2: Homework guidelinesManatee County school district's new homework guidelinesKindergartner and first grade: The homework guidelines are available at www.

Click on Student Progression Plan. Then there's the excuse for not doing it. Tirelessly, the kids tried. Amused teachers, who have heard most of them, remained unimpressed. It's pretty funny when you tell them you don't believe them," said Lisa Adams, a language arts teacher at Buffalo Creek Middle. Still on the list of lame excuses in middle school is the timeless refrain involving the family pooch.

Some high schoolers obviously gave their cover some thought. A student once told Manatee High teacher Michelle McCarthy he was involved in an accident in Fort Myers, and the car he left his homework in was wrecked and impounded.

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Some of the latest arrivals at the Manatee County jail, Friday, Sept. Lakewood Ranch continues to expand. Take Us With You Real-time updates and all local stories you want right in the palm of your hand. They also learn to learn meaning they learn new methods and new ways to improve themselves when doing homework.

Your fellow 6th grader, Kaitlyn N Pack. It helps students because it is kind of a revision. Like from school we learn the topic and at home we just revise. For example if teacher does not give any homework we may get less marks. The reason is because if we dont practice we may forget the facts.

Practice makes a man perfect. If students are not given homework, I wonder how many of them would even do something productive in their increased free time, let alone open their textbooks and reabsorb what they've learnt in class. Also, sometimes while doing homework, students may find doubts that they can ask their teacher.

Homework also allows students to sit down alone unless they're group-studying and take their own time to understand and test what they've learnt.

The problem only arises when a teachers burden students with homework so that they have no choice but to rush through it without understanding. B teachers use homework as an excuse to not teach. C students themselves blindly do homework giving it no importance.

Teachers and professors teach concepts and the how to's in class. However, that is not enough. Once students get home they need to reinforce and reflect on what they've learned in class. Without reinforcement, students can easily forget what was learned in class. There are rare students who do not require reinforcement, however, the rest of the regular students need to reinforce what was learned.

Homework is the proper way to do this. Kids often feel better studying in a comfortable environment. I hated studying at another friend's house, and always found it relaxing to do homework in my room. As an introvert, I felt I could truly focus and complete my work at an area I was used to.

Having the entire afternoon and evening to do the homework is comforting and lets the child manage their time correctly at their own pace, instead of the intervals at school. Homework and yes it can be annoying but it reinforce the concepts you learn in class. In addition, lecture time is small and they don't have much time. I realize this is probably more directed to kids K through 12, but it still applies. If Reading the text book actively, underlining, putting questions marks make you a learner.

Also interest level in a subject plays a role, if you don't like the topic much you won't pay much attention.

I believe homework helps you be responsible to study and be active learner. As a college student I get homework and yes it can be annoying but it reinforce the concepts you learn in class. If I remember from high school lecture is about 55 minutes. Reading the text book actively, underlining, putting questions marks make you a learner.

Fear not homework is the best solution to this problem. Students should get homework because homework is a great preparation for tests, you will have a better understanding about the topic, and its a productive way to spend your spare time. Students should get homework because it's a great preparation for tests, tests are the prime piece that goes on your report card. You will want to be prepared for it, so you can do well on it. Homework will help you do that because you can memorize and be better at what you're doing it so when the test comes, you feel confident that your going to do good well because you studied.

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Does homework really help my child? In , the Canadian Council on Learning analyzed 18 studies to update Harris Cooper’s research on this contentious topic.

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But what does homework really do for kids? Is the forest’s worth of book reports and math and spelling sheets the average American student completes in her 12 years of primary schooling making a difference? is an ineffective way to help children become better learners and thinkers. 24/7 learning at home | ADHD | Advocate for your.

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Sep 14,  · At my school, we all think that homework helps people learn in so many different ways. You do your homework to get better grades on test scores because some of the homework you get will have some stuff that can be on test. Another reason is that homework can get you better grades if you just hand it in. You can learn from homework. I’d see more coming; the immediate effects are simple, if an ESL student is trying to do a simultaneous translation of what you are saying while you does homework really help you learn saying it.

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You might think that open-minded people who review the evidence should be able to agree on whether homework really does help. If so, you’d be wrong. “Researchers have been far from unanimous in their assessments of the strengths and weaknesses of homework as an instructional technique,” according to an article published in the . Homework and yes it can be annoying but it reinforce the concepts you learn in class. In addition, lecture time is small and they don't have much time. I realize this is probably more directed to kids K through 12, but it still applies.