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Critical analysis of “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson Essay

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❶Foreshadowing Because the story of "The Lottery" holds back on revelation of what is happening so long it is vital that it uses foreshadowing to prepare the reader. They are just trapped in the lottery tradition unwillingly.

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At first it seems as if its just childish play but we then see at the end of the story what the main purpose of those stones were. These details of the story were actually a foreshadowing of her fate. However, once I figured out the theme of the story and all the little elements that the author had applied in the story, it made much more sense when I reread it a second time.

The main concept of the story was reality put into a story form. Accessed September 14, Leave your email and we will send you an example after 24 hours If you contact us after hours, we'll get back to you in 24 hours or less.

How to cite this page Choose cite format: How about make it original? Sorry, but copying text is forbidden on this website. If you need this or any other sample, we can send it to you via email. We'll occasionally send you account related and promo emails. The choice of the author to not explain this is one of the most important choices in the story.

Perhaps the most interesting of the theories on the lottery's meaning is the simple idea of the scapegoat. The basic idea of the scapegoat has existed since the early days of Judaism. In that tradition it was literally a goat, but the idea is to sacrifice a single person for the sins of the society is generally how it has been used metaphorically. Beyond this literal idea of being sacrificed for the sins of others is a more general idea that people need to have someone to blame or hate.

The idea being that by being able to simply heap all of their aggression onto one person they are able to free themselves of it for another year. Beyond that of the scapegoat and humankind's basic nature, the other theme of this story is one of tradition. Specifically, it is commenting on those things that people do simply because that is what has always been done.

These can range from harmless traditions such as easter egg hunts and Christmas trees to far more harmful traditions such as racism, sexism, and even war. Even in this very dark story though, the author does hold out some hope. There are people in other villages who have abandoned the lottery and eventually perhaps this town will change as well.

But that change, like all important changes, won't be fast or easy. There are a number of excellent examples of dramatic irony in the story.

The basic idea of the lottery as something, which in our society is generally a good thing, being evil is the chief irony of the story. This helps to strengthen both the surprise and horror of the story. In addition, it helps to keep the reader from catching onto the basic idea of the story.

Just as important is the irony that is found just over halfway through the story. At this point, two men are discussing a town that has stopped performing the lottery. The core of the story of "The Lottery" is in its symbols. Nearly everything in the story is symbolic. The most basic of these symbols being the lottery itself. This can represent a number of different ideas, but the most basic is that of tradition and specifically unquestioned traditions.

Traditions like this exist as much in our society as that of "The Lottery". Many of them are simple and unimportant like Christmas trees and far more sinister ones such as racism and sexism are still troublesome today and were even bigger problems in when this story was published. The difficulty of all of these is that they are far harder to see in our own society than in those we are less familiar with.

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"The Lottery" by Shirley Jackson is a story of an unusual town caught in a trap of always following tradition, even when it is not in their best interest. Jackson uses symbols throughout the story that relate to the overall theme. This helps the reader clearly understand her main message.

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The Lottery by Shirley Jackson Essay Words | 4 Pages. The Lottery By: Shirley Jackson Summary: The Lottery happens in June every year in a small village of about people.

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"The Lottery" Shirley Jackson The following entry presents criticism on Jackson's short story "The Lottery" (). See also Shirley Jackson Contemporary Literary Criticism. - Conformity in Society Exposed in Shirley Jackson’s The Lottery The Lottery, a short story by the nonconformist author Shirley Jackson, represents communities, America, the world, and conformist society as a whole by using setting and most importantly .

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Essay: The Lottery by Shirley Jackson “The Lottery”, a short story, by Shirley Jackson is a very suspenseful yet shocking read, which focus on how tragic it can be to blindly follow a tradition. The story is set in a small town, on the summer morning of June 27th. Overall Shirley Jackson discusses the movement of the setting, the unusual foreshadowing, and the outermost symbolism in “The Lottery” to give an overall point of view of the story. Even though a small village made seem peaceful, and a good place to raise a family, it is not always what it seems to be.